Miso Roasted Eggplant Gyoza

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I can’t go too long without having some dumplings. I mixed a finely chopped eggplant with miso sauce and used it as the filling. Very simple but packed with flavor. I normally let them steam but this time I pan-fried them. They are crispy little delights.

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This recipe makes about 30 gyoza.

Ingredients:

1 large eggplant, chopped into very small cubes

About 30 gyoza wrappers, defrosted

For the miso sauce:

1 tablespoon of aka miso

1 teaspoon of honey

3 tablespoons of soy sauce

1 tablespoon of white vinegar

1 tablespoon of ginger syrup

1 tablespoon of sesame oil

2 tablespoons of sesame seeds

For the dipping sauce:

1 tablespoon of chopped fresh ginger

3 tablespoons of chopped chives

Juice of 1 lime

1 bird’s eye chili, finely chopped

1 tablespoon of sesame oil

1/3 cup of soy sauce

Extra:

Vegetable oil for pan–frying the gyoza

 

Preheat your oven to 180C/350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

To make the dipping sauce, just mix all of the ingredients in a bowl. Set it aside.

Thinly slice the eggplant and then chop it into very small cubes.Since the wrappers are quite small, you want the eggplant chopped as finely as possible.

Place all of the ingredients for the miso sauce in a large bowl and whisk until everything is well combined. Add the eggplant and mix well.  Spread it evenly on the prepared baking sheet. Roast it for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through the cooking time. Then allow it to cool down.

Once the eggplant has cooled down, start to assemble the gyoza. Place about 2 teaspoons of the filling in the center of the wrapper, brush the edges of the wrapper with some water and then fold it into a half moon shape. Starting at one end, fold/pinch the wrapper tightly together. Keep going until it is completely sealed, trying to get rid of any air bubbles. Repeat for all.

Once the gyoza are ready, pour about 1 cup of vegetable oil in a large pan over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, fry the gyoza in batches until golden on both sides. This will only take a few minutes and since the filling is already cooked, it goes quite fast. Place the gyoza on a plate lined with parchment paper to absorb any excess oil.

Serve them right away with the dipping sauce. Enjoy!

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Kale, Tofu and Peanut Potstickers (Gyoza)

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I have been on a peanut butter strike lately. There are months where I can go without eating peanut butter and some where I eat it every day.  I was watching an episode of Anthony Bourdain’s Parts unknown, where he was in Shanghai eating all these dumplings.  And of course I got a very strong urge to eat them as well.

I try to go meatless at least 3 to 4 times a week, so these kale and tofu potstickers are great for that. I added a bit of peanut butter to the filling and they turned out great.  I made this for dinner yesterday and served them with some white rice and kale chips.  It was a really nice combination to get some crunchy kale with the dumplings and dipping sauce.  This recipe makes about 30 potstickers. For the meat version, you can check out my recipe for Pork and ginger potstickers.

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Ingredients:

300gr silken tofu

100gr of kale, chopped

2 spring onions, finely chopped

2 tablespoons of ginger, minced

1 chili, finely chopped

2 tablespoons of soy sauce

2 tablespoons of sesame oil

2 teaspoons of peanut butter

Sprinkle of Chinese five spice powder

1 pack of Gyoza wrappers

Dipping sauce:

½ cup of soy sauce

Juice of one lime

2 teaspoons of sesame oil

Half of a spring onion cut very finely (white included)

1 teaspoons of grated fresh ginger

1 tablespoon of honey

Kale chips (optional):

A small bowl of chopped up kale (chopped small as if it were for a slaw)

A teaspoon of olive oil

A sprinkle of salt

 

First leave the frozen dough out for a few hours to thaw.

For the dipping sauce, just combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl.

To make the kale chips, preheat the oven to 150C/300F.  Put the chopped kale in a bowl; add the olive oil and salt. Massage it with your hands so the oil gets in between all the leaves.  Arrange on a single layer in a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Bake for 15 minutes.

Press the tofu in between paper towels to get rid of excess liquid. In a large bowl combine the tofu, kale, spring onion, ginger and chili.

In a small bowl, mix the soy sauce, sesame oil, peanut butter and Chinese five spice powder. Add the peanut sauce to the kale and tofu. Mix well.

To assemble the Potstickers, just add about a teaspoon of the filling in the middle of each wrapper.  You can brush the sides of the wrapper with an egg wash or some water. Then fold the wrapper in half to form a half moon shape. Starting on one end, fold/pinch the wrapper tightly together. Keep going until it is completely sealed, trying not to get any air bubbles.  Repeat for all.

Boil some water.

Brush a non-stick pan with a lid, with a bit of vegetable oil, just enough for the Potstickers not to stick. Once the pan is hot, place the potstickers inside, and cook until one side is golden. Then add half a cup of water and cover right away. Be careful because it will splatter. The water will steam the dumplings. Once the water has evaporated, let it cook for another minute uncovered so the brown side can crisp up again.

Serve right away.

Pork & Ginger Potstickers (Gyoza)

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I love potstickers. They are so easy to make and the combination of fillings is just endless. When I first started making these, I would make them completely from scratch by making the hot water dough to form each wrapper. But that is too time-consuming, so nowadays I just buy the wrappers. Pork and ginger is still my favorite filling for these dumplings.

This recipe makes about 35 pot stickers.

Ingredients:

For the Pot stickers:

1 pack of Gyoza wrappers (these are the round ones, but if you can’t find them, wonton wrappers will do), about 35 wrappers.

500 grams of ground pork (don’t get the lean pork, the fat gives flavor)

2 tablespoons of chopped fresh ginger

2 spring onions, sliced very finely (white parts included)

1 tablespoon of sesame oil

1 tablespoon of soy sauce

Vegetable oil for frying

For the dipping sauce:

½ cup of soy sauce

Juice of one lime

2 teaspoons of sesame oil

Half of a spring onion cut very finely (white included)

1 teaspoons of grated fresh ginger

A tablespoon of rice wine vinegar

1 small chili cut very finely

 

First leave the frozen dough out for a few hours to thaw.

To make the dipping sauce, just combine all the ingredients in a bowl.

In a bowl, mix the ground pork with the ginger, spring onions, sesame oil and soy sauce.

Have a small bowl with water ready, use it to seal the edges of the wrappers.

I find it easier and faster if I work in a small assembly line. So in my cutting board I place 6 wrappers. Using my finger, I brush a bit of water on the edges of the wrapper. Place 1 teaspoon of the filling in the middle of each wrapper.

Once that is done, fold the wrapper in half to form a half moon shape. Starting on one end, fold/pinch the wrapper tightly together. Keep going until it is completely sealed, trying not to get any air bubbles.  Do this for all of them.

Once they are all folded. Over medium heat, pour 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a pan with a lid. Place the pot stickers in the pan and cook until the bottoms are golden. Have the lid ready. Then add 1/4 of a cup of water and cover the pan right away. Be careful because it will splatter. The water will steam the pot stickers. After 2 minutes, remove the lid and allow the bottoms of the potstickers to crisp up again.

Serve and enjoy!